Tree

Acacia complanata

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Acacia complanataFamily: Fabaceae
Genus: Acacia
Common names: Flat-stemmed wattle
ALA reference

This is a very showy small wattle that has bright golden yellow pompom shaped flowers. The stems are flattened with a winged ridge along each side of the stem making it very easy to identify. I’ve only found a couple of plants in the reserve but there are quite a few growing beside Fort Road in the Canossa bushland. (January 2008)

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Acacia disparrima subsp. disparrima

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Acacia disparrimaFamily: Fabaceae
Genus: Acacia
Common names: Brown salwood
ALA reference

This wattle can be separated from the other wattles in the reserve that have similarly shaped phyllodes (“leaves”) by observing the veins in the phyllodes. In this species the longitudinal nerves never join each other. The flowering period is very short lived, lasting only a few days to a week. I was amazed to note that all the trees of this species in the reserve and around the district came into bloom on virtually the same day. (January 2008)

Acacia fimbriata

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Acacia fimbriataFamily: Fabaceae
Genus: Acacia
Common names: Fringed wattle, Brisbane wattle
ALA reference

This is a fast growing wattle that develops into a large shrub or small tree to about 6 metres in height. It has thin narrow phyllodes (“leaves”) with a fringe of hairs along the edges. The flowers tend to be lemon yellow and almost smother the plants. While there are several in the Reserve it isn’t particularly common here. (August 2008)

Acacia leiocalyx subsp. leiocalyx

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Acacia leiocalyxFamily: Fabaceae
Genus: Acacia
Common names: Brisbane black wattle
ALA reference

Right across the district this species has flowered magnificently this month. It can be differentiated from Acacia concurrens (also called Black Wattle) by the reddish tint on the young branches and by a close examination of the flower calyx which is hairless. Acacia concurrens does not have red tints on the young branches and the flower calyx is always hairy. Note that the racemes of flowers normally arise in pairs from the base of the phyllodes (“leaves”). (August 2008)

Acacia maidenii

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Acacia maideniiFamily: Fabaceae
Genus: Acacia
Common names: Maiden’s wattle
ALA reference

This wattle is common in the reserve and grows to about 20 metres in height. It can be distinguished from the other wattles in the reserve by the following features; the longitudinal veins in the phyllodes (leaves) are joined and there are prominent lenticels (small raised white dots) on the branchlets. The pale yellow flowers are followed by long thin twisted and coiled seed pods. (April 2008)

Acronychia imperforata

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Acronychia imperforataFamily: Rutaceae
Genus: Acronychia
Common name: Beach acronychia
ALA reference

We have three Acronychia species growing in the Reserve viz; A. imperforata, A. laevis and A. pauciflora. All three species are in flower this month. Note the distinct joint where the petiole joins the leaf. This feature is a characteristic of all the Acronychias. (February 2011)

I found this poor tree smothered in Cat’s Claw creeper, with its top knocked off and pushed sideways by the fallen tree that had taken out its top. It is unusual to find this plant growing so far inland, because as the common name implies, it is usually found quite close to the coast. A botanist from the Queensland Herbarium has confirmed the identification. (August 2007)

Acronychia laevis

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Acronychia laevisFamily: Rutaceae
Genus: Acronychia
Common name: Glossy acronychia
ALA reference

About a dozen of these small trees that grow to about 10 metres are scattered across the Reserve. The glossy dark green leaves are distinctly jointed where the petiole meets the leaf blade and are quite strongly scented when crushed. The fruit is glossy, four-angled with a ripply surface and up to 12 mm in diameter. The fruit are edible but have a rather resinous taste. (June 2010)