Grass

Aristida gracilipes

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Aristida gracilipesFamily: Poaceae
Genus: Aristida
Synonym: A. vagans var. gracilipes
Common names: Wire grass, Three-awn Speargrass
ALA reference

This fine wiry grass is about a metre high and growing beside the northern firetrail. The tall thin ascending culms have four or five nodes and several slender branches. They have three very obvious awns on the top of the mature seeds. (December 2011)

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Cenchrus purpurascens

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Cenchrus purpurascensFamily: Poaceae
Genus: Cenchrus
Common names: Swamp Foxtail
ALA reference

The plant that is growing in the swampy, wet area below the storm water drain outfall has finally flowered and can now be identified. I’ve been watching it for about a year now with the expectation that it might be a sedge. However it has turned out to be a grass that is now classified as Cenchrus purpurascens, but it appears in most books, including Mangroves to Mountains, as Pennisetum alopecuroides (Swamp Foxtail). Its status as a native or introduced species is rather confused. In Mangroves to Mountains it is listed as an introduced species and was similarly classified by the Queensland Herbarium until quite recently. However the Queensland Herbarium now considers it to be a native species as does the Flora of New South Wales. I suspect that the source of the seed for this plant was from a plant growing in Fort Road and that seed was washed down the storm water drain. (March 2012)

Chloris divaricata

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Chloris divaricataFamily: Poaceae
Genus: Chloris
Common names: Slender Chloris
ALA reference

This slender grass is growing in the Reserve beside the top end of Eddystone Road. The three to eight flowering spikes are digitate and almost horizontal to slightly ascending. (December 2011)

Chloris ventricosa

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Chloris ventricosaFamily: Poaceae
Genus: Chloris
Common names: Plump Windmill Grass, Tall Chloris
ALA reference

This tall stoloniferous grass can grow to a metre high with from 2 to 15 spikes arranged digitately. Two rows of spikelets are arranged symmetricately on the underside of each spike as shown in the photo on the right. (February 2010)

Chrysopogon sylvaticus

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Chrysopogon sylvaticusFamily: Poacaea
Genus: Chrysopogon
ALA reference

This densely tufted perennial grass grows to about 1.5 metres with large arching flower-heads of a rusty-golden colour. It is growing in the south-west corner of the Reserve as well as in the open Eucalypt forest. When not in flower it can be distinguished from Cymbopogon refractus by the yellow-green leaf colour and the slightly broader leaves. (February 2008)

Cymbopogon refractus

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Cymbopogon refractusFamily: Poaceae
Genus: Cymbopogon
Common name: Barb-wire grass
ALA reference

About a year or so ago the large barbed-wire grass plant just to right of centre in the photo appeared as a seedling in an area that had been cleared of cat’s claw creeper. It is now surrounded by possibly a hundred seedlings from the seeds it produced last year. I’m quite surprised by just how quickly this species has colonised the open patch of ground. (April 2011)

Dichelachne montana

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Dichelachne montanaFamily: Poaceae
Genus: Dichelachne
Common names: Brisbane Plumegrass
ALA reference

In February 2008 this species was listed in the register as Dichelachne sp. (Brisbane B.K.Simon 3221). It is now recognised as a form of Dichelachne montana. (October 2011)